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Do you poop out at parties?

The Insecure Writer's Support Group

I forgot that sometimes you need to go out after work and drink mojitos until you're cross eyed.

I've been so busy working and writing and fulfilling all of my other "obligations" I haven't set time aside for FUN, and fun is important. It makes life worth writing about -- without it your stories are sad, boring, one-dimensional piles of depressing crap. And that's how I feel -- sad boring and poop like.

Not now of course. Right now I'm feeling very close to awesome, because I went to the bar this evening and drank four mojitos and remembered there is more to life than writing and working. (And don't worry, I arranged a ride home with my husband beforehand so I didn't ride the bus home drunk.)


I felt so good at the bar I was tempted to put my legs over my head, but I was one mojito shy of a train wreck. I'm rather thankful for that considering it's only Wednesday, and I have to face my coworkers tomorrow and the day after.

Throw your brain a party when its tired and miserable. Don't do it every day or even once a week, but once a month or so -- don't worry about all of the pages you have to write or the stuff you have to do at work tomorrow. Give yourself permission to cut loose -- don't get out of hand; don't tell the skeevy guy from the office that you absolutely hate his guts; don't do gymnastics if your more than two years into your 30s -- have a good time.

Balance is important -- keeping track of that gauge that alerts you "it's time to slow down, Sweetness. Your sanity is up in flames." A solid work ethic is admirable, but it's useless if it puts you in the nut house.

Just Keep Going!

"Ignore your inner nagging thoughts. They are seldom accurate perceptions of what you are actually achieving. It is deeply unfair to criticize your navigation skills when taking a journey into unknown territory. Try not to demoralize yourself. I call my first draft “the Lewis and Clark.” Any freaking way to the coast -- is the correct way! Do not criticize yourself for the odd wrong turn, the weather slowing you down, having to stop for supplies. There is no bad route when you are on a voyage of discovery. Just keep going!"

-- PEN DENSHAM

Comments

  1. Woo Hoo!!!! 4 mojitos and I am under the table!! I am impressed!!! Sometimes you just need it!

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  2. You know what they say -- "A mojito a day -- rots your liver." If I could just get a schedule now for life's little mishaps, I could plan my fun accordingly.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great advice! I'm not a drinker but I do have plenty of vices at my disposal for those mental health days: online shopping, fast food, long walks... and swinging on swings. Yes, I still swing on swings. Yes I'm about to turn 32 (I could still do some gymnastics then? nah, my knees would scream at me) But that's the town's fault for putting a kiddie park two blocks from my house. And a Burger King... which necessitates those long walks and trips to said park. Oy.

    I feel like this comment was a bit of a 'fun break'... I've been making the rounds through all the IWSG blogs and trying to leave comments that make me sound like a serious, intelligent writer who actually knows what I'm talking about. Haha.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Logical advice that consistently seems to elude our frantic thoughts :) thanks for the reminder.

    visiting from IWSG

    ReplyDelete

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